FANDOM


File:Ona.jpg

The Order of Nine Angles (ONA) is a purported secretive Satanist organization, initially formed in the United Kingdom, and which rose to public note during the 1980s and 1990s after having been mentioned in books detailing fascist Satanism.[1][2][3][4] Presently, the ONA is organized around clandestine cells (which it calls "traditional nexions")[5][6] and around what it calls "sinister tribes".[7][8]

HistoryEdit

According to their own testimony, the Order of Nine Angles was originally formed in England in the 1960s, with the merger of three neopagan temples called Camlad, The Noctulians, and Temple of the Sun. Following the original leader's emigration to Australia, it has been alleged that David Myatt took over the order and began writing the now publicly-available teachings of the ONA.[9] The ONA now has associates, and groups, in the United States,[10] Europe, Australia,[9] New Zealand,[1] Canada, Russia, and Iceland.

Author Nick Ryan has asserted that Anton Long, the author of the ONA's public tracts, is a pseudonym of David Myatt, a person who was involved with the neo-Nazi movement in England.[11] This assertion is repeated by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke, who claims that David Myatt was the founder of the ONA and writer of most of the ONA documents,[12] and had previously acted as bodyguard for "British Nazi Colin Jordan".[13]

Ryan states in his book that Myatt lived in the 1990s on a smallholding in Shropshire with Christos Beest, who has given several interviews on behalf of the ONA[14] and performed a live recording of The Self-Immolation Rite that was included with Vol. 2 No. 3 of Fenrir.

David Myatt has always denied such allegations about involvement with Satanism,[1] the ONA, and using the pseudonym Anton Long, and repeatedly challenged anyone to provide any evidence of such allegations.[15] In addition, Myatt challenged two journalists - Nick Lowles (from Searchlight) and Nick Ryan - to a duel for repeating such allegations, a challenge which they both declined.[16][17]

Gerry Gable, from anti-fascist magazine Searchlight, said: "Myatt is an ethereal character who has used numerous aliases to post messages on extremist websites. He is a dangerous man who has twice been jailed for his violent right-wing activities and who openly asked for blood to be spilled in the quest for white Aryan domination. We believe... he remains a deeply intellectual subversive and is still one of the most hardline Nazi intellectuals in Britain today. Myatt believes in the disruption of existing societies as a prelude to the creation of a new more warrior-like Aryan society which he calls the Galactic Empire."[18]

David Myatt converted to Islam in 1998[19][20][21] and changed his name to Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt.[22]. In 2010 he publicly rejected Islam, having developed his own mystical philosophy called The Numinous Way[23][24][25]

BeliefsEdit

The Order postulates Satanism as being a highly individualized quest that aims to create self-excellence and wisdom, by undertaking challenges that allow a person to transcend his physical and mental limits.[26] It is meant to involve the arduous achievement of self-mastery and Nietzschean self-overcoming, with an emphasis on individual growth through practical acts of risk, prowess and endurance.[9] Rites of passage, often connected to promotion in grade level, include spending three months living rough in a forest bereft of human contact,[14][1] and the assumption of difficult occupations to develop personality and leadership ability.[9] This is meant to aid in the evolution of the individual: "this new individual will be fierce, free, exult in exploration and discovery and possess an essentially pagan attitude to life."[27] This, in turn, will lead to the transformation of society into a higher, refined civilization.

According to the ONA:

"Satanism is understood by its genuine adherents as a particular Occult way or method. That is, it is a specific path or way toward a specific goal, the following of which involves a particular way of living. The specific path, or 'Left Hand Path', is a dark, sinister one, and the specific goal is the creation of a new type of individual. On a more general level, Satanism is concerned with changing our evolution and the societies we live in - creating, in fact, a new human species and a civilization appropriate to the new type of human being." (Anton Long: Satanism: A Basic Introduction for Prospective Adherents, Thormynd Press, England, 1992)

In addition, the ONA claims that its sinister tribes are an important part of its Aeonic, sinister, strategy to build a new, tribal-based, more sinister way of life, and to disrupt and eventually overthrow the societies of what it calls "the mundanes".[28][29][30]

The ONA's writings condone and encourage human sacrifice[11][31][32][33] as a means of eliminating the weak: Anton Long describes it as "a contribution to improving the human stock, removing the worthless, the weak, the diseased (in terms of character)".[34] This "culling" serves not just a social Darwinian purpose, but is also connected to the promotion of a new Aeon: "The change that is necessary means that there must be a culling, or many cullings, which remove the worthless and those detrimental to further evolution."[35] Thus, true Satanism, they assert, requires venturing into the realm of the forbidden and illegal, in order to make contact with the "sphere of acausal, sinister forces on the cosmos."[9] The presencing of acausal energies, such as through culling, is meant to create a new Aeon, whose energies will then create a newer, higher civilization from the energy unleashed.[36]

Probably because of the ONA's highly radical stance, there is open animosity between the ONA and "mainstream" Satanists such as the Church of Satan.[11] The ONA publicly disavows any connection to Church of Satan, claiming the Satanic Bible to be a "watered-down philosophy".[37] The ONA eschews the religious type of approach evident in groups such as the Temple of Set and regards other Satanic groups, such as the Church of Satan, with contempt.[38]

The Temple of Set proscribed the ONA in the early 1980s for its avowal of human sacrifice.[39]

The ONA has its own, unique, ontology and theology of Satanism, based on the axioms of (1) a bifurcation of Reality into an acausal continuum and a causal continuum, and (2) the existence of acausal beings in this acausal continuum, one of whom is the being conventionally known as Satan.[40]

FootnotesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Ryan, Nick. Into a World of Hate. Routledge, 1994, p. 53.
  2. Lewis, James R. Satanism Today: An Encyclopedia of Religion, Folklore, and Popular Culture. Abc-Clio Inc., 2001.
  3. Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. Black Sun: Aryan cults, esoteric Nazism, and the politics of identity, NYU Press, 2002, pp. 215-216.
  4. Ankarloo, Bengt and Clark, Stuart. The Twentieth Century, U. Penn. Press, 1999, p. 113.
  5. Frequently Asked Questions About The Order of Nine Angles
  6. Senholt, Jacob C: Political Esotericism & the convergence of Radical Islam, Satanism and National Socialism in the Order of the Nine Angles. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Conference: Satanism in the Modern World, November 2009. [1]
  7. Angular Momentum: From Traditional to Progressive Satanism in the Order of Nine Angles
  8. Sinister Tribes of the ONA
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. Black Sun, NYU Press, 2002, p. 218.
  10. Questions For Anton Long by WSA352
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 Ryan, Nick. Into a World of Hate. Routledge, 1994, p. 54.
  12. David Myatt
  13. Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. Black Sun, NYU Press, 2002, p. 216.
  14. 14.0 14.1 Satanicwebsites.com Interview with Christos Beest previously appearing in Devilcosm #3, on Satanicwebsites.com
  15. The National-Socialist (March 1998, Thormynd Press, York, England).
  16. "A Statement for Journalists". Archived from the original on 2007-03-05. http://web.archive.org/web/20070305140910/http://www.dwmyatt.info/jstatement_new.html. Retrieved 2007-03-23. 
  17. "The Machinations of Journalists". Archived from the original on 2009-10-24. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http://www.geocities.com/davidmyatt/machinations1.html&date=2009-10-24+10:22:11. Retrieved 2007-03-21. 
  18. icBirmingham - Midland Nazi turns to Islam
  19. Greven, Thomas (ed) (2006) Globalisierter Rechtsextremismus? Rechtsextremismus in der Ära der Globalisierung. VS Verlag, p.62
  20. Woolcock, Nicola & Kennedy, Dominic. "What the neo-Nazi fanatic did next: switched to Islam", The Times, April 24, 2006.
  21. Michael, George. (2006) The Enemy of My Enemy: The Alarming Convergence of Militant Islam and the Extreme Right. University Press of Kansas, p. 147.
  22. Steyn, Mark. America Alone: The End of the World as We Know It, Regnery, 2006, p. 93
  23. "The Culture of ἀρετή". http://www.davidmyatt.info/culture-of-arete.html. Retrieved 2010-12-03. 
  24. Myngath - Some Recollections of the Wyrdful Life of David Myatt, Thormynd Press, 2010 ISBN 978-0-557-56804-8
  25. A Change of Perspective
  26. Long, Anton. "An Introduction to Traditional Satanism", 1994.
  27. Long, Anton. "Crowley, Satan and the Sinister Way", 1992.
  28. Angular Momentum: From Traditional to Progressive Satanism in the Order of Nine Angles
  29. We, The Drecc
  30. Frequently Asked Questions About The Order of Nine Angles
  31. Long, Anton. "Hysteron Proteron". 1988.
  32. http://pages.prodigy.net/aesir/tdi.htm "The Dark Imperium", essay by John J. Reilly.
  33. Perlmutter, Dawn. "Skandalon 2001: The Religious Practices of Modern Satanists and Terrorists", in Anthropoetics Volume VII, number 2
  34. Long, Anton. "Culling: A Guide to Sacrifice II." 1990.
  35. Long, Anton. "Darkness Is My Friend: The Meaning of the Sinister Way", 1996.
  36. Lewis, James R. Satanism Today: An Encyclopedia of Religion, Folklore, and Popular Culture, Abc-Clio Inc., 2001, p. 197.
  37. Susej, Tsirk. The Demonic Bible, Lulu Press, 2006, pp. 35-36.
  38. http://camlad9.tripod.com/onahell.txt
  39. Satanic Letters 1
  40. Ontology and Theology of Traditional Satanism

ReferencesEdit

  • Ankarloo, Bengt and Clark, Stuart. The Twentieth Century. U. Penn. Press, 1999.
  • Gardell, Mattias. Gods of the Blood: The Pagan Revival and White Separatism. Duke University Press, 2003. ISBN 0-822330-71-7
  • Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism, and the Politics of Identity. New York University Press, 2002.
  • Kaplan, Jeffrey, ed. Encyclopedia of White Power: A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc., 2000.
  • Lewis, James R. "Who Serves Satan?" in Marburg Journal of Religion, Volume 6, No. 2 (June 2001).
  • Lewis, James R. Satanism Today : An Encyclopedia of Religion, Folklore, and Popular Culture, 2001, ISBN 1-57607-292-4
  • Long, Anton. Satanism: Introduction for Occultists. Thormynd Press, 1992, ISBN 0-946646-29-5
  • Order of Nine Angles. The Black Book of Satan. Thormynd Press, 1984, ISBN 0-946646-04-X
  • Order of Nine Angles. Naos. Coxland Press, 1990, ISBN 1-872543-00-6
  • Perlmutter, Dawn. "The Forensics of Sacrifice: A Symbolic Analysis of Ritualistic Crime", in Anthropoetics (The Journal of Generative Anthropology) Volume IX, number 2 (Fall 2003/Winter 2004) [2]
  • Perlmutter, Dawn. "Skandalon 2001: The Religious Practices of Modern Satanists and Terrorists", in Anthropoetics Volume VII, number 2 [3]
  • Reilly, John J. Apocalypse and Future. Xlibris Corporation, 2000, ISBN 0-7388-2356-2
  • Ryan, Nick. Homeland: Into A World of Hate. Mainstream Publishing Company Ltd., 2002, ISBN 1-84018-465-5
  • Senholt, Jacob C. The Sinister Tradition. MA Thesis. University of Aarhus, Denmark. 2008
  • Senholt, Jacob C: Political Esotericism & the convergence of Radical Islam, Satanism and National Socialism in the Order of the Nine Angles. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Conference: Satanism in the Modern World, November 2009. [4]
  • Sieg, George: Angular Momentum: From Traditional to Progressive Satanism in the Order of Nine Angles. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Conference: Satanism in the Modern World, November 2009 [5]
  • Wessinger, Catherine Lowman. Millennialism, Persecution, and Violence. pp.317-318. Syracuse University Press, 2000. ISBN 0815605994

External linksEdit

es:Orden de los Nueve Ángulos nl:Order of Nine Angles pt:Ordem dos Nove Ângulos sv:Order of Nine Angles

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.